piggy noise

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:51 pm


I merged your threads. You get ONE medical thread per pig on the forum.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:02 pm


"Yesterday he was eating hay and drinking water but today, the 13th, he just wants to stay in his hut."
It sounds very much like he needs to see a vet ASAP. Not eating could mean extreme pain from the stone OR that the stone has moved into his urethra and is now causing a blockage. You MUST handfeed if he isn't eating or drinking on his own. It sounds like this has been going on for quite some time, and now has reached a critical/emergency stage.

Get him to the best vet you can locate and do it now. You can worry about the cost later.

sozansound2

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:39 pm


Alright thank you

And

@sef I already went to a vet today and it is when I had them do the x ray and got 100% proof it is a bladder stone.

I gave him his lettuce with bell peppers soacked in water and he ate it all. Then went to get a strand of hay and went to his usual part of the cage. I soaked the veg in water as I didn't see him reach for the water bottle. Even grabbed it and place it in front. Maybe 1 bite and that is it. The hay he ignores but may get 1 and leave. Water I can easily hand feed it to him. Hay I have no clue.

sozansound2

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:40 pm


They got a urine sample so the stone isint in a position to block the urethra as of now too.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:16 pm


It does sound like you need to have it removed surgically.

You will want to read these pages so you are prepared for his recovery:
http://www.guinealynx.info/surgery.html
http://www.guinealynx.info/postop.html
http://www.guinealynx.info/pain.html
http://www.guinealynx.info/handfeeding.html

I hope the surgery goes well.

sozansound2

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:53 pm


Appreciate it.

I brought the water bottle to him and he has drank a bunch of water so far. The water bottle I have gives out a burst of water so he gets a bunch all at once.

He still goes crazy for the pellet bag rustles. That is how I motivate him to come out.

I put some hay near the hut opening and he has eaten some hay so atleast I am not so worries all at once :)

User avatar
Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:32 am


I realize that you took him to a vet for x-rays; my point was that it sounds like the stone is causing him an enormous amount of pain, and it will not get better on its own. Did they test for a secondary urinary tract infection? Staying in his hidey and not wanting to eat or drink on his own is a warning sign that should not be ignored. Are you monitoring to make sure he is urinating? Are you weighing him? Handfeeding? Were you given any pain meds?

I think you need to understand how painful and potentially dangerous and bladder stones can be, and how important for his quality of life it will be to treat it appropriately and promptly.

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:15 am


So I am here and they checked to make sure he can urinate and he can. They collected a sample. They do not want to operate him due to the high mortality rate cavies have. They wanted to see if he can pass it on his own.

I really do not know what to do. They measured how big the stone is and it is the exact size as another pig they receive not to long ago. The other pig had the same size stone and was able to pass it. It is 10 mil in size. Theu want to see if he can pass it and try and avoid surgery if possible.

They said to continue with the metacam, they want him on an antibiotic and they want to give another kind of pain med as well. I will post names of the other 2. They said to watch to make sure he urinates and to come back if he hasn't for 8 to 14 hours. Same with the coloring of urine like blood and such. Same for pooping. If anything hits these categories, they said to come back as that is an emergency. A note aswell is that this is also the facility connected to the adoption center next door that took care of them till I came along to adopt. Theu are familiar with my 2 pigs.

I am not an expert so I dont know what to do exactly. I do know how painful it is to pass something like this. I had a similar experience.

I can definitely hand feed and he does accept that and his body shape is excellent. That is what they said upon examination.

Any further advice is very much appreciated.

He does come out but not as often as I would like too and he does move as well. The other female pig I have has started to kinda nudge him more often and more hyper than normal. Bothering him allot but no fights. Normal bantering. I thought I should note that as well.

I am about an hour drive from this location as well. I don't mind but coming back and forth definitely is tiresome but will do it for the sake of my pig if need too.
Last edited by sozansound2 on Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
iastate09
Supporter in '15

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:24 am


I would find an exotics vet that will do surgery. Pigs (especially males) rarely, if ever, pass bladder stones on their own, in my experience. Are you weighing him?

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:28 am


Yesterday he was 2.4 lbs and the ones near my area arent the best rated so it is risky. I dont known were to look

User avatar
iastate09
Supporter in '15

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:32 am


Have you checked out the Thread on Rhode Island Vets? http://www.guinealynx.info/records/viewtopic.php?f=73&t=273&sid=185c0f68d9c0513ea823cb300e04eefe

Don't know if any of these are drive-able for you.

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:34 am


I will check them out and I am in the parking lot torn if I should go on and convince them. I am at a big lose right now.

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:34 am


My vet called ocean state and they said for some reason they dont do surgery on pigs for stones

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:39 am


Compassionate care in Cumberland does not operate on pigs. Theu referred me to ocean state. Like the post above, they don't operate on pigs for stones :/

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:46 am


I called wickford and they said they do operate on pigs for stones but they are booked for this week and they can't provide me an estimate. I feel like even if I go the operation route, it will not be today sadly

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:21 pm


So wickford can do the surgery and has great approval rate for their vets who perform surgery and much better in pricing than the one I was at.

The potential surgery day wont be till friday doe which sucks but I have a consult with them later today to discuss everything and them to evaluate my male piggy.

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 1:53 pm


I was wondering if I can use a juicer to get the juice out of a piece if pepper and hand feed him that or if things arent looking good in his eating, giving him the juice of pepper with critical care?

Is that am effective thing to do?

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:19 pm


So i am back home and hand feed him just 1 cc of water. Does anyone know the recommended amounts of water to feed in total for the day by any chance?

I gave him 1 just for now and cleaned him up a bit. I checked the place I transported him. It was 1h to the hospital and 1h back home. I only saw like half a poop. It means he isint pooping. He is urinating doe. He dosen't really eat hay much. I dont know if he will reject his pellets which is his favorite.

Is critical care a good alternative for introducing him to fiber and everything needed to kick start the pooping process?

Clearly I need to wait, maybe, for the surgery day unless when I go to the second opinion vet later in 3h he sees it as an emergency and maybe give me a date much sooner.

User avatar
Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:28 pm


Guinea pigs generally need anywhere between 30ml-100ml of fluids per day. 1cc isn't going to cut it if he doesn't drink from his water bottle. He will need a significant amount of watery veggies and Critical Care to make up that amount, so I would strongly suggest that you alternate feeding Critical Care with giving water by syringe. Do take care to avoid aspiration on either the water or the CC. See:
http://www.guinealynx.info/handfeeding.html

It's imperative that he stay well-hydrated, particularly while he is on Metacam (an NSAID).

Handfeeding with Critical Care is also going to be essential if he isn't eating on his own. I wouldn't see the point in using a juicer with bell peppers; Critical Care contains all of the nutrients that he will need if he isn't eating veggies and pellets. You can certainly try that if he doesn't like the flavor of CC, however. Some of us have had better luck warming the CC briefly (5-6 seconds) in the microwave, which seems to improve the consistency and flavor for pickier eaters.

He also needs hay. Try freshening up the hay or offering a different brand to entice him to eat it. If he won't come out of his hidey to eat, keep small piles of hay close to the hidey so that he can reach it.

I'm glad that you were able to make an appointment for him for surgery. Do also read:
http://www.guinealynx.info/stones.html
http://www.guinealynx.info/surgery.html
http://www.guinealynx.info/postop.html

sozansound2

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:06 pm


Thanks for the water amount.

About how much ml of critical care per meal? I know it is split between 4-6 a day. Since he ate his lettuce this morning, I will do 3 for today and tomorrow will be the usual. I have a bunch of syringes I have from the vet so I can alternate between critical care and water.

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