piggy noise

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:17 pm


Since he is weak and not accepting anything when hand feeding food or medicine, is a motility drug recommended?

User avatar
Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:17 pm


Motility drug helps stimulate the natural "waves" in the gut that move food along and out of the body. If he's fighting the syringe, that's one thing. If he cannot chew or swallow, that's more serious. Handfeeding is sometimes called "forced feeding" and for a reason. You *must* get food into him. If he fights you on it, you just have to be gentle but firm. Follow the handfeeding instructions and do as I mentioned: cut the tip of the syringe off, warm up the Critical Care (warm, not hot), push the syringe past the front teeth towards the back of the mouth and at an angle. Then slowly push the plunger. Watch that he is chewing. When he stops chewing, push a little more. Little bit at a time.

IF on the other hand, he is just letting food dribble out of his mouth and seems unable (vs. unwilling) to eat, he may need IV fluids at the vet. Do they have an after-hours emergency number if you need it?

User avatar
Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:18 pm


ETA: There must be food in the stomach in order for the motility drug to work.

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:19 pm


There are some emergency locations around here but I stayed away from the 2 near me because of certain reviews i read over the years

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:23 pm


And some locations require the history the vet who operated on him to actually be able to do something so that narrows down the places I can go dramatically

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:31 pm




This is what they did. Looks like they did an additional iv treatment.

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:12 pm


I know they gave him critical care and iv fluids so I feel comfortable he isint gonna starve.

Unless anyone has suggestions,

I will wait till 1pm tomorrow if he is still with me. I don't want him to end up coming to the point and starve to death.

I can't live with that. It will probably be best if I take him to the vet to put him to sleep.

I am gonna watch him all night if he ends up getting strenght back. I will not give up on him but I don't want him to suffer like this if he wont chew when I place the syringe on the side of his mouth.

I still don't know if it was the best course of action to bring him back but I would like to be reunited with my closest loved ones if something similar happened to me.
In this case, it is with the female pig for burrito.

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:37 pm


I have noticed now that when I rub the sole of his back foot he ether moves the other foot or scoot upward. I believe that was more effort so far taking him home. Still wont chew doe.
He also kinda did a tiny noice,I believe tired ish but dint quote me and a big breath outwards like 30min after the whole scooting upward.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:42 pm


I do not understand why they gave him penicillin. It looks like it was by injection instead of orally but Penicillin is not recommended for guinea pigs.

Did they give you any pain medication? Like Meloxicam?

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:45 pm


Is that metacam?

Cause if it is then yes I do but I can't administer it because he won't chew.

I remember reading penicillin isint good for pigs but I only found out what she used was when he was this low and was gonna take him home to attempt nursing.

Honestly, she was probably the best vet I could find to do this operation because hands down any other very would just slice his stomach instead of manipulating the stone and doing a small slice to remove from the penis and seal it with 1 suture. I was super scared and nervous how I would hand feed him with something like a big sutured wound you know.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:50 pm


Yes.

Look over these tips for giving medications:
http://www.guinealynx.info/tips.html

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:59 pm


I can't because he wont start grinding his teeth so it tells me he is not swallowing and risk aspiration

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:25 pm


I do have a syringe that is used for rabbits and ot has a long curved tip but I don't know if that is enough lenght to bypass his respiratory track so I dont want to use it and risk deeper suffering for my little boy

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:28 pm


You put one of the regular 1cc syringes in the side of the mouth, a little ways back to where the molars are and wiggle it. There is a natural reflex to chew.

Is your guinea pig limp? Completely unresponsive?

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:34 pm


So a short version. Surgery for the bladder stone was successful. She manipulated the stone to come out to the penis and slice a bit to get it out.

He woke up and was eating. He was very responsive. He loved the critical care that he would reach for it. 2 hours later he went downhill.

He is weak and wont chew when the syringe is next to his mollars. I had to make a decision what to do. I decided to reunite him and the female pair at home and give him some time and see if I can nurse him. He has been here for 4 hours.

Noticed a while back he is moving more of his legs and scooting foward when touching his back legs and now I am here.

Just checking up on him. Gonna watch him even overnight incase I catch him moving and maybe start swallowing by God's will.

The stone was blocking urine from coming out and when removed, she placed a catheter and mentioned the urine did look ugly. I assume there could maybe be other problems going on or it was the anesthesia and really hit him hard and with everything he went through with the pain of the stone and such.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:38 pm


With the long, curved tip syringe, you could give the pain medication very, very slowly. Practice with some plain water first if you are worried. You must wiggle the syringe to get the chewing motion to start.

Watch for any diarrhea.
http://www.guinealynx.info/diarrhea.html

When he woke up, he probably felt fine because of pain medication used during surgery.

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:43 pm


There are three posts by Talishan in this forum. They contain valuable information for post operative care. I encourage you to read them:
http://www.guinealynx.info/records/viewforum.php?f=29

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:43 pm


I have tried for a while so I decided to lay him down with warm blankets and let him rest. I will attempt in a little bit and see if he will chew

I was thinking the same thing but they had closed to ask if they had an injectable pain killer of sorts that is not the ones that messes up a piggy

sozansound2

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:48 pm


If he is still with me, I will call and see if they have something and try to see if we can get some thing in him if he responds immediately.

I will take a look at those for sure. It is very heart breaking when the only thing u can do is the one thing he cant do which is grind his teeth at the moment. The other is Male him comfortable as possible

User avatar
Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:49 pm


This is the most important topic for you to read. There are other pain medications that could help too.
http://www.guinealynx.info/records/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=231

Most importantly, Talishan writes:
DON'T GIVE UP!!
Many, many pigs go straight downhill after they get home from the vet, and after 24, 48, 60 or more hours of intensive care, sleep lost to hand feeding, worry and stress, you will be at the end of your rope. That’s exactly when you DON’T want to give up. Guinea pigs can take you to your very last nerve postoperatively, and just when you think there isn’t one ... more ... thing you can do, THEN they turn the corner and get better, sometimes very quickly and often very dramatically. DON’T give up. Keep going and doing what you need to do to help them through the recovery period. It will be well, well worth it, for your cavy and for you.
I will be off the board shortly and apologize if there is no one to answer further questions.

I hope your guinea pig recovers.

Post Reply
100 posts