Too Cold to Take Guinea's outside?

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IssaG

Post   » Tue Nov 17, 2020 8:08 pm


I know guineas are sensitive to heat but what about cold? I'm in the pacific NW where it doesn't freeze, it rains. 50s and 60s are normal for the winter. We had them outside a couple times in the mid 60s, they puff up like marshmallows but seem to enjoy being outside. We block the wind, put hideys out and some fleece so they can get into warmer places but they seem to like being on the grass better. So wondering how much cold they can handle.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Tue Nov 17, 2020 8:27 pm


We had one over at GPC that spent several nights in a snow bank in sub-freezing weather and didn't have any ill effects. But I certainly wouldn't recommend that! I wouldn't put them out in bad weather, and probably not when the temps are below the mid 50's. I assume we *are* talking aboiut haired pigs, right?

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Lynx
Celebrate!!!

Post   » Tue Nov 17, 2020 9:25 pm


The rain and humidity might cause problems. If you are outside with them for a little safe exercise (in an enclosed area) fine but otherwise I sure would keep them inside for safety.

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Nov 18, 2020 10:24 pm


I agree with Lynx, a little protected fresh air when it's cool in the 60s is probably just fine, but I wouldn't keep them out too long.

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PooksiedAnimals
Supporting my GL Habit

Post   » Thu Nov 19, 2020 11:10 am


I worry about their feet getting too cold. I usually figure if I'm not comfortable sitting on the ground for any length of time, they're not comfortable either.

IssaG

Post   » Thu Nov 19, 2020 4:11 pm


Yes they are haired piggies. And they live inside, this is just enrichment and getting them some fresh air and grass. We don't take them out in the rain or right after the rain. The ground will be mostly dry. Though we have given them access to dry dirt and small rocks to walk on and they seem to enjoy checking out different surfaces for short times.

I worried about their feet getting cold too, and their feet do get cold, but they don't seem to care. They won't stay on the fleece I put down and barely spend any time in the hideys even though they could eat grass easily from both. When I pick them up, their feet are cold but their bodies are warm. They look very cute puffed up.

We have them out 30 min to an hour depending on the weather. They enjoy it, it hasn't so far seemed to affect them, so glad to hear we're not causing problems.

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Renonvsparky

Post   » Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:37 am


I don't take mine outside when the temperature is below 65° or above 85°, or if it's windy or raining. No matter what the temperature is, I always keep them out of direct sunlight unless it's in the evening when the sun is setting. Even more important than making sure they don't get too hot or too cold is making sure you don't leave them alone, even for a second. That's all the time it takes for something bad to happen to them. You can't be too careful.

IssaG

Post   » Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:17 pm


Oh I agree, we never leave them alone. At least me or my husband is sitting out there by the enclosure. They are so much fun to watch it would be such a waste to take them out and not watch them roam and play. The only quasi close call we had is when the neighbor's dog slipped under our gate and came in the back yard barking. My husband keeps his eye on the osprey overhead. I can't imagine they are a danger but one never knows.

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Renonvsparky

Post   » Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:10 pm


I've had to shake a stick at a stray cat or two. There are hawks around, but they mostly stay in the giant field the next street over. There's plenty of rodents there to keep them well fed. Other than that, it's pretty safe for my boys to go outside to graze and play, weather permitting. As long as I keep a very close eye on them, they'll be ok. Going outside for grass time is the one thing they enjoy most out of all the things we do together. I have 7 of them, but I never take more than 4 of them out at a time. They take turns.

Bookfan
For the Love of Pigs

Post   » Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:00 am


We have a lot of deer in our yard along with assorted other wildlife. Since the great influx of deer I've been concerned about the deer leaving anything behind that could make the pigs sick. Of course we'd check first, but we've had so many deer over the last few years there may be remnants of poo anywhere that's not obvious.

I know racoons have some bacteria in their poo that is very bad, at least to humans. We've got 2 little piles of racoon poo on our deck, so I know they are around.

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Lynx
Celebrate!!!

Post   » Sat Nov 21, 2020 9:09 pm


We have a house deer. She likes to lay in front of one or the other side windows of our bermed up house. Lots of pictures - the deer doesn't go far even when we interrupt her accidentally. Slightly under the eaves, out of the wind on windy cold days.

Mostly she lays down and looks at the woods but sometimes she checks out the house.

Image

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sun Nov 22, 2020 1:12 am


That's funny how the deer comes to check on you! Wildlife is so smart. My songbirds know when I fill the feeders because I shake the seed scoop. It can be so quiet outside and as soon as I get the scoop, the chickadees are busy telling each other about it. The flying squirrels are the same way - no where to be seen but as soon as I fill the feeders they show up. I've had Orioles come back in the spring and they would hang upside down looking in the windows wondering why the jelly feeder wasn't out yet.

Bookfan
For the Love of Pigs

Post   » Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:56 am


The house deer is beautiful! A peeping Tom? Does she run away if you approach the window?

Orioles hang upside down??

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Lynx
Celebrate!!!

Post   » Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:01 pm


I guess I try not to make her too uncomfortable. Didn't see her today. My daughter has been quite close for some of the pics she took and the deer seemed to be okay with it.

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